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Cabernet Sauvignon - Nickel and Nickel Single Vineyard (Yogt Howell Mtn)

Date: Thu, Apr 22, 2010


DescriptionName:Cabernet Sauvignon
Color:Red
Grape(s):Cabernet Sauvignon
Appellation:Vogt Vineyard Howell Mountain Napa Valley California
Maker:Nickel & Nickel
Vintage:2006
Cost:$50.00
Comments:

Food PairingsMeats & Seafood:x
Sauce:x
Cheese:x
Other:x

Taste ProfileNotes:This 2006 Vogt Cabernet Sauvignon was made in both open-and closed-top tanks, which produced a wine with great concentration. The dark fruit flavors of berry and cassis are intensified by some natural floral and spice nuances. The palate is rich and coating with an intensity that comes from low-production, hillside fruit. Toasty oak integrates well with the firm yet polished tannins that, although approachable now, will resolve with some time in the bottle.
Quick Classification:Big Red



Private NotesSource:Wine Group 1003
Comments:

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Red Wine May Shield Brain from Stroke Damage

Date: Wed, Apr 21, 2010


Johns Hopkins researchers discover pathway in mice for resveratrol's apparent protective effect. Researchers at Johns Hopkins say they have discovered the way in which red wine consumption may protect the brain from damage following a stroke.

Two hours after feeding mice a single modest dose of resveratrol, a compound found in the skins and seeds of red grapes, the scientists induced an ischemic stroke by essentially cutting off blood supply to the animals' brains. They found that the animals that had preventively ingested the resveratrol suffered significantly less brain damage than the ones that had not been given the compound.

Sylvain Doré, Ph.D., an associate professor of anesthesiology and critical care medicine and pharmacology and molecular sciences at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, says his study suggests that resveratrol increases levels of an enzyme (heme oxygenase) already known to shield nerve cells in the brain from damage. When the stroke hits, the brain is ready to protect itself because of elevated enzyme levels. In mice that lacked the enzyme, the study found, resveratrol had no significant protective effect and their brain cells died after a stroke.

"Our study adds to evidence that resveratrol can potentially build brain resistance to ischemic stroke," says Doré, the leader of the study, which appears online in the journal Experimental Neurology.

Red wine has gotten a lot of attention lately for its purported health benefits. Along with reducing stroke, moderate wine consumption has been linked to a lowered incidence of cardiovascular disease — the so-called French paradox. Despite diets high in butter, cheese and other saturated fats, the paradox goes, the French have a relatively low incidence of cardiovascular events, which some have attributed to the regular drinking of red wine.

Doré cautions against taking resveratrol supplements, available alongside vitamins and minerals and on websites touting its benefits, because it is unclear whether such supplements could do harm or good. He has not tested resveratrol in clinical trials. And while resveratrol is found in red grapes, it's the alcohol in the wine that may be needed to concentrate the amounts of the beneficial compound. Doré also cautions that drinking alcohol carries risks along with potential benefits.

He also notes that even if further research affirms the benefits of red wine, no one yet knows how much would be optimal to protect the brain, or even what kind of red wine might be best, because not all types contain the same amount of resveratrol. More research is needed, he says.

Doré says his research suggests that the amount needed could end up being quite small because the suspected beneficial mechanism is indirect. "Resveratrol itself may not be shielding brain cells from free radical damage directly, but instead, resveratrol, and its metabolites, may be prompting the cells to defend themselves," he suggests.

"It's not likely that brain cells can have high enough local levels of resveratrol to be protective," he says. The resveratrol is needed to jump-start this protective enzymatic system that is already present within the cells. "Even a small amount may be sufficient," Doré says.

Doré says his ongoing research also suggests some therapeutic benefits to giving resveratrol to mice after a stroke to limit further neuronal damage.


Author: Unattributed
Web Site: www.redorbit.com
Source: Article

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Pinot vs. Pinot

Date: Wed, Apr 21, 2010


Split a single vineyard down the middle and tell two winemakers to pick their fruit at the exact same time. Offer them the identical winemaking equipment and require that their stylistic winemaking decisions be equivalent. Bottle the two wines on a specific date and taste the two side by side in one sitting. If it’s Pinot Noir they’ve crafted, the two wines will surely defy all common parameters put in place. In fact, they might taste so unique from each other you’re calling one a 2002 and the other a Cab Franc.

Pinot Noir may be the most elastic varietal in viticultural history. Its expression of terroir in the glass is as colorful as its midnight blue hue when ripe on the vine. Like putty, Pinot Noir reflects every fingerprint inflicted, each microscopic maneuver adding up to much bigger changes on the palate in the long run. Given this chameleon-like nature, it is no surprise Willamette Valley Pinot tastes so different from its Russian River counterpart, grown several hundred miles south. But on the grand scale of state-versus-state comparison, Pinot Noir’s ever-changing character is a little easier to investigate.

Masculine vs. Feminine
At the first annual Pinot Days Grand Tasting in Santa Monica, California, adjectives like “lush,” “opulent” and “syrupy” are being tossed about like confetti. Some 85 wineries - mostly Californian - have gathered under one roof to showcase how they’ve handled Pinot Noir. Many of the wineries brought their winemakers and they stand out immediately. They wear tired faces, still recovering from the previous harvest. What’s being poured here is not so much Pinot Noir as the triumphant blood of a year-long bout with the most ornery and romantic of foes.

Many of the wines are 2007s, a delicate vintage in Oregon but because of excessive heat and drought in many parts of California, the Pinots on display are big and bold. A few Oregon representatives are on hand, pushing their bustier, less bashful 2006s and dodging questions about the “challenging” 2007 vintage. Holding the samples up to the bright lights hanging from the rafters, there is little clarity and plenty of deep, inky purple.

Hitching Post is pouring, a family owned Central Coast operation immortalized by Paul Giamatti in Sideways. Their 2006 Pinots are refreshingly light and floral, so soft they’re sneaky. A few stands over, Central Coast outfit Derby Wine Estates is pouring their 2006, a seemingly trim and soft spoken Pinot until I glance at the label and notice an ABV of 14.8 percent. Suddenly I am experiencing the same haunting range I associate with Willamette Valley Pinot. The California wines are generally heavier with an emphasis on darker fruit flavors, but the extent of the former and latter can be measured only on the widest of sliding scales.

Carneros wineries with heavy reputations like Domaine Chandon are strutting their stuff and fielding questions from an endless line of empty glasses. While complex, their 2007 is quite burly, a Dundee Hills Pinot Noir on performance enhancers. Impressive up-and-comers like Hirsch Winery of extreme western Sonoma County talk up the nurturing effects of gentle coastal winds in between pouring their own Pinots. I savor the length and earthy undercurrents of their two Pinots but can’t help but ask if there’s a little Cabernet or Merlot blended into the robust wine. The answer is no.

Aside from the occasional deviation from a daring winemaker who decided to pick two weeks early or move from berries only to whole cluster pressing, the California Pinots tread heavily, but with noticeable personality and range. These Pinots are nothing if not masculine, at least compared to the leaner, delicate, feminine Oregon Pinots I am more familiar with. And when a fellow Portlander comments about how easy the drive is to northern California for weekend sales trips, I crack a smile, fascinated by what 500 miles can do to Pinot Noir.

The Market
The masculine versus feminine breakdown is often construed as a geographic one. American Pinots tend to be more lush and fruity than those from the Old World. Moreover, European Pinot tends to be lighter and earthier than New World Pinot. There are countless exceptions, of course, especially with a grape winemakers are still trying to figure out. But now that the West Coast is an established enological gem of international interest, there are quotas to meet, standards to adhere to and distinctions to be made. Northern California - specifically Napa and Sonoma - is America’s leading tourist destination for wine buffs. While careful craftsmanship is still prized, wine is big business here and for many companies to survive a wine that sells is often better than a wine that wows.

Statewide, California produces about five times as much Pinot Noir as Oregon and its friendly climate and countless wineries attract over 20 million tasters a year. Nine out of 10 bottles of wine produced in the US from the Golden State. In short, California vintners are subject to greater competition and a broader consumer base. The masses that flock to California are chasing wines that have earned some of the best scores in American Pinot Noir’s roughly fifty-year existence. And many of these scores echo praise for a certain California style of winemaking, one that favors rich, powerful, heavy-handed Pinot Noir.

Tired of the norm, a small group of like-minded California winegrowers has recently pushed for lighter, more Oregon Pinot Noir. Eric Asimov wrote a telling piece last spring entitled “Finesse And Light: California Pinot Noirs With A Manifesto” for the New York Times (March 10, 2009). In it, he paints this unconventional uprising as a healthy rebellion, one born out of a cooler year (2006) that produced less sugary fruit and more elegant wines. Asimov draws on the European idea that Pinot Noir is meant to be savored with food and therefore should not drink like a meal in itself.

Pinot Noir is a niche within a towering industry, even in California. Those in the know appreciate its stubborn ways and laud a well-made batch. Unlike many Oregon wineries whose sole focus is Pinot Noir, many California wineries split their attention among several thriving varietals. This is not to say there aren’t California projects completely invested in Pinot because there are many. Yet, with higher production levels and an environment favorable to a host of varietals, there is simply a greater risk of a California producer to treat this grape of grapes like Syrah or Chardonnay when it demands to be treated like a dysfunctional baby. But these factors don’t hold a candle to the main culprit in Pinot’s state-to-state variation.

The Terroir
Whereas Oregon’s Willamette Valley shares the 45th parallel with Burgundy, France, California Pinot country is more akin to the northern Rhone region. Additional sunshine lengthens the California growing season, upping brix levels and the potential for potency in the finished product. In Burgundy and northern Oregon, harvest is almost predetermined. The brief summer growing season gives way to autumn precipitation abruptly, affording a skinny albeit variable window for picking fruit every year. In California, a longer growing season alleviates pressure on when to harvest. For better or worse, grapes can hang on the vine longer in the Santa Lucia Highlands or Sonoma Coast, extending the age-old gamble of balanced, fully developed fruit versus post-mature, overly concentrated raisins.

Pinot Noir loves well draining soil and both states boast an abundance of it. Rich, volcanic Jory soils in the Dundee Hills of Oregon are responsible for many of the state’s most acclaimed Pinots, renowned for its ability to strike a tasty accord between acidity and earthiness. Sonoma County alone has more soil types than all of France, affording it tremendous flexibility in Pinot Noir profiles. The topography is higher reaching in California Pinot country, especially in Sonoma County where vines prefer to be up and away from the prominent coastal fogs. Closer proximity to the Pacific Ocean means cool nighttime temperatures for northern California, which balance out daytime highs that generally exceed those of Oregon. The threat of snow is virtually nonexistent in California AVAs, but because the vines are dormant during the winter months this remains a less critical factor.

Stretching distinction further, Pinot Noir has the most genetic mutations of any varietal. The University of California-Davis has over 100 registered Pinot Noir clones. Essentially, there are so many steps to making drinkable Pinot that it’s highly unlikely for two winemakers to carry them out identically, let alone complete them all. Some don’t last past harvest, the varietal’s low yield and fragile build bankrupting even the brightest winemaking minds in the business.

Wine law accounts for a significant shift in winemaking philosophies between the two states. Currently, California still adheres to the federal standard which requires that for a Pinot Noir to be labeled as such, it must contain at least 75 percent of that varietal. Oregon’s law is stricter, demanding at least 90 percent Pinot Noir for it to bear the varietal name. These laws apply to all varietals, but pertain closely to stubborn Pinot Noir, which often needs a helping hand in balancing the flavor or boosting the color of the bottled product. Many argue that the stricter regulations pave the way for purer Pinot Noir in Oregon, but that’s a debate too lengthy for this story.

What California Pinot does almost always reflect is the ample amount of sunshine. On average, California producers pick at Brix levels (sugar content readings) significantly higher than those of Oregon vintners. This leads, generally, to a higher alcohol content in California Pinot, if not a syrupy consistency and a flavor scale that leans more towards fruity than earthy. As a result, California producers are less likely to chaptalize (adding fermentable sugar), a practice frowned upon by purists in Oregon but still practiced by many wineries.

The Future
Back at Barker Hangar in Santa Monica, I am pleased to be tasting such a different Pinot Noir. There is chatter about climate change and the possibility of Merlot in the Willmatte Valley fifty years from now. I try to imagine that, coupled with an influx of tourists during the summer months and wonder what kind of Pinot Oregon will be bottling then. After all, there may be no varietal as expressive and symbolic as Pinot Noir. If it’s a hot vintage, the wine will boldly speak of that. If the grapes were mishandled, flaws will end up in the glass. If it’s grown at higher elevations, it will express the layered struggle of doing so. And if it was created in California it will surely stray from its Oregon brethren. It’s not that the other wines of the world are not products of their environment. It’s that Pinot Noir is to such an extreme. Like a polished mirror, Pinot reflects every thing that comes near it.

Mark Stock, a Gonzaga grad, is a Portland-based freelance writer and photographer with a knack for all things Oregon.

Author: Mark Stock
Web Site: oregonwinepress.com
Source: Article

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Magnificat Bordeaux Blend from Franciscan

Date: Sat, Apr 17, 2010


DescriptionName:Magnificat
Color:Red
Grape(s):56% Cabernet Sauvignon, 40% Merlot, 3% Malbec, 1% Petit Verdot
Appellation:Oakville California
Maker:Franciscan
Vintage:2006
Cost:$50.00
Comments:

Food PairingsMeats & Seafood: Poached, grilled, fried, baked or roasted beef, lamb, game and game birds.
Sauce: Au jus, savory, tomato, mustard, peppercorn
Cheese: Soft or hard goat cheese, hard cow and sheep cheese
Other: Chocolate

Taste ProfileNotes:Deep garnet. Inviting aromas of dark cherry, sage, and red plums. Complex layers of ripe berries, with undertones of vanilla and cloves. Full-bodied and textural, with ripe flavors of black plum and cherry, cocoa and cassis. A concentrated, rich palate with round tannins leads to a long finish interwoven with blackberry, anise and mocha.
Quick Classification:Dry Red



Private NotesSource:
Comments:

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Zinfandel - Ridge Geyserville

Date: Thu, Apr 15, 2010

DescriptionName:Zinfandel
Color:Red
Grape(s):70% Zinfandel, 18% Carignane, 10% Petite Sirah, 2% Mataro
Appellation:Geyserville vineyard Sonoma County California
Maker:Ridge Vineyards
Vintage:2006
Cost:$35.00
Comments:

Food PairingsMeats & Seafood: Poached, grilled, fried, baked or roasted beef, lamb, game and game birds.
Sauce: au jus, savory, tomato, mustard, peppercorn,chil
Cheese: Hard cow and sheep cheese
Other: Spicy foods and cuisines

Taste ProfileNotes:Black raspberry, blueberry, smoked meat and dried violet on the nose. Juicy red and dark berry flavors are dusted with minerals and firmed by supple tannins, with an exotic floral note emerging on the back. Finishes sappy, sweet and long, with a deeper cherry note. Quite complex."
Quick Classification:Dry Red

Private NotesSource:
Comments:

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Bad Wine

Date: Thu, Apr 15, 2010


I’m not talking about the swill we get served at parties or at aunt Edna’s house at Christmas. I’m talking about wine that should be good but has gone bad. Wine usually ends up spoiled for one of three reasons, TCA, oxidation or heat.

Here’s a quick test. Fresh picked blueberries, juicy peach, toasted vanilla bean, and wet dog paw; which one does not belong? The first three flavors are great descriptions for wine. The last one describes a bottle contaminated with TCA or that is “corked” as it is more commonly described. Nuances of wet dog, mildew or refinery are an indication of TCA, a mold that infects corks and bottling facilities. TCA contamination starts out as a loss of fruitiness, progresses to a loss of flavor and finally begins to stink.

When you encounter a bottle that is corked, and sooner or later you will, don’t hesitate to return it. Restaurants and retailers get credit for bad bottles of wine. Estimate are that one bottle in twelve is tainted with TCA, so statistically there’s one bad bottle in every case of wine. But just because one bottle has it, doesn't mean that another bottle from the same case is also contaminated. TCA won’t hurt you, but it can turn a great wine into something undrinkable. Screw caps are making a comeback because of TCA.

Exposure to excessive heat, can quickly destroy a wine. This can happen in your home if you store wine in the kitchen near heat sources or anywhere high were heat accumulates. It is quite often a problem in restaurants where storage space is limited and wine is sometimes stored near the kitchen. In summer months prolonged storage by the winemaker or distributor can also lead to cooked wine. The most obvious symptom of a cooked wine will be the cork protruding slightly from the bottle (the capsule may be bulging). Wine may actually have been pushed out of the bottle by the heat. While cooked wine is nice in a Coq Au Vin, you won’t like it in your glass. Cooked wines are dull and lifeless with no fruit in the aroma. Not surprisingly they also tastes cooked.

Last, but not least, is oxidation. We want to expose wine to air immediately before drinking, so we decant or swirl our glasses vigorously. However prolonged exposure to air causes oxidation and will ruin a bottle. Oxidation occurs when the cork fails and large amounts of air are admitted to the bottle. Oxygen is a highly reactive element and chemically changes the wine; and not for the better. An obvious clue that oxidation may be occurring is a deteriorated and/or moist cork. In red wines it will be obvious that wine is leaking around the cork (if wine leaks out, air leaks in) because the cork will be red on top or on the side at the top. Oxidized wines have a brown tint and taste burnt or like raisins. People who don’t like Port say oxidized wines taste like Port.

You can detect all of these faults and avoid the disappointment of drinking a bad bottle of wine, simply by observing the proper etiquette when ordering or opening wine. Inspect the cork. Has it deteriorated? Is it moist all the way to the top? Is there evidence of wine leaking around it? If so, pay close attention to the aroma and color of the wine. When it is poured, look at the color. White wines should be white or yellow, red wines should be garnet in color. Is it browner than it should be? When you swirl and smell the wine, does it smell fresh and alive? When you taste it, does it feel and taste like fruit or berries? And you thought this sniffing and swirling stuff was all for show.

The general rule is, if the wine doesn’t seem right to you, send it back. Retailers and restaurateurs understand that spoiled wine is a fact of life and will gladly open a new bottle without question.


Cellar Notes

Here a two very nice, yet affordable red blends, indicated by the terms meritage and cuvee. However, in this case the cuvee is a blend of Zinfandel from various areas of California.

Meritage from Nine Points
Zinfandel Cuvee from Rosenblum

A note about vintage – If you are unable to locate a vintage shown in Cellar Notes, with some significant exceptions, you may find the next vintage year very similar. Modern viticulture and production methods have reduced, although not eliminated, dramatic year-to-year variation.

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Cain Concept Bordeaux-Style Red Blend

Date: Wed, Apr 14, 2010

DescriptionName:Concept
Color:Red
Grape(s):58% Cabernet Sauvignon, 18% Merlot, 17% Cabernet Franc, 7% Petit Verdot
Appellation:Benchlands Napa Valley California
Maker:Cain Vineyard & Winery
Vintage:2005
Cost:$45.00
Comments:

Food Pairings
Meats & Seafood: Poached, grilled, fried, baked or roasted beef, lamb, game and game birds.
Sauce: Au jus, savory, tomato, mustard, peppercorn
Cheese: Soft or hard goat cheese, hard cow and sheep cheese
Other: Chocolate

Taste ProfileNotes:A generous and rich wine. Cutting through the chocolate and cocoa powder, you find notes of coffee, tea and raspberry. Small quantities of Cabernet Franc, Merlot, and Petit Verdot are blended with Cabernet Sauvignon to build complexity, add nuance, articulate the structure, and lengthen the finish.
Quick Classification:Dry Red

Private NotesSource:
Comments:

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Cabernet Sauvignon - Bosche Estate Freemark Abbey

Date: Wed, Apr 7, 2010

DescriptionName:Cabernet Sauvignon - Bosche Estate
Color:Red
Grape(s): 91% Cabernet Sauvignon, 9% Merlot
Appellation:Bosche Vineyards, Rutherford, Napa Valley, California
Maker:Freemark Abbey
Vintage:2005
Cost:$70.00
Comments:

Food PairingsMeats & Seafood: Poached, grilled, fried, baked or roasted beef, lamb, game and game birds.
Sauce: Au jus, savory, tomato, mustard, peppercorn
Cheese: Soft or hard goat cheese, hard cow and sheep cheese
Other: Chocolate

Taste ProfileNotes:Dark cherry, black currant, cinnamon, aromatic cedar and green olive with hints of dark chocolate and cigar box. Good depth of flavor with black fruits, chocolate and integrated oak spice. Lively, with elegant tannins and a very long, clean fruitful finish.
Quick Classification:Big Red

Private NotesSource:First tasted at a locker tasting at Raffa's
Comments:

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Champagne - Brut from Veuve Clicquot

Date: Wed, Apr 7, 2010

DescriptionName:Champagne - Brut
Color:White
Grape(s):66% Pinot Noir & Pinot Meunier 34% Chardonnay
Appellation:Champagne France
Maker:Veuve Clicquot Ponsardin
Vintage:NV
Cost:$45.00
Comments:

Food PairingsMeats & Seafood: Poached, raw, grilled, fried, baked or roasted fish, crustacean shell fish and fowl.
Sauce: Au jus, white, chili, herb
Cheese: Hard cow and sheep cheese
Other: Sushi

Taste ProfileNotes:A wonderful smooth-textured Champagne with flavors of apricot, peach, vanilla pastry and mineral; good acidity and a long finish.
Quick Classification:Drier White

Private NotesSource:
Comments:

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Pinot Noir from Alexana (Revana)

Date: Wed, Mar 31, 2010

DescriptionName:Pinot Noir
Color:Red
Grape(s):Pinot Noir
Appellation:Revana Vineyard - Dundee Hills Willamette Valley Oregon
Maker:Alexana Winery
Vintage:2007
Cost:$38.00
Comments: Alexana Winery is owned by Dr. Madaiah Revana, who also produces Cabernet Sauvignon at his Napa, Revana Family Winery.

Food PairingsMeats & Seafood:Poached, grilled, fried, baked or roasted fish, crustacean shell fish, beef, pork or fowl.
Sauce:Au jus, white, savory, herb
Cheese:Soft or hard goat cheese, medium cow and sheep cheese
Other:Mushroomsx

Taste ProfileNotes:Cherry red, the 2007 Pinot Noir from the Revana Vineyard has aromas of cinnamon,, clove, smoke, cherry, and raspberry. Seamless on the palate with well-integrated oak and tannin. A round, ripe, flavorful, and well balanced Pinot Noir. More color and intensity than typical northern climate Pinot Noir's.
Quick Classification:Soft Red

Private NotesSource:KWWG tasting at Revana's original KW home 1002
Comments:

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Old Vine Zinfandel from August Briggs

Date: Tue, Mar 30, 2010

DescriptionName:Old Vine Zinfandel
Color:Red
Grape(s):Zinfandel
Appellation:Napa Valley
Maker:August Briggs Winery
Vintage:2006
Cost:$30.00
Comments:

Food PairingsMeats & Seafood: Poached, grilled, fried, baked or roasted beef, lamb, game and game birds.
Sauce: au jus, savory, tomato, mustard, peppercorn,chil
Cheese: Hard cow and sheep cheese
Other: Spicy foods and cuisines

Taste ProfileNotes:Intense, classic Zin-berry fruit character in a full bodied but balanced style.
Quick Classification:Dry Red

Private NotesSource:Wine group at Zammitti's 100328
Comments:

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Meritage from Nine Points

Date: Sun, Mar 28, 2010

DescriptionName:Nine Points Meritage
Color:Red
Grape(s):No specifics were provided about this blend, but meritage implies a red Bordeaux-style blend of some combination of Cabernet Sauvignon, Merlot, Cabernet Franc, Petit Verdot and Malbec.
Appellation:Sonoma County California
Maker:Nine Points Winery (see comments)
Vintage:2006
Cost:$17.00
Comments: The 2005 Nine Points Cabernet was a private label bottling from Stag's Leap Cellars for Safeway and its various chains of grocery stores (Randall's, etc.). The source of the 2006 wines is uclear.

Food PairingsMeats & Seafood: Poached, grilled, fried, baked or roasted beef, lamb, game and game birds.
Sauce: Au jus, savory, tomato, mustard, peppercorn
Cheese: Soft or hard goat cheese, hard cow and sheep cheese
Other: Chocolate

Taste ProfileNotes:Nine Points is a pleasent, easy drinking, red Bordeaux-style meritage, with dark likeable fruity flavors soft tannins and a velvety finish.
Quick Classification:Soft Red

Private NotesSource:
Comments:

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Rosso di Montepulciano from Salcheto

Date: Sat, Mar 27, 2010

DescriptionName:Rosso di Montepulciano
Color:Red
Grape(s):Sangiovese
Appellation:Rosso di Montepulciano Tuscany Italy
Maker:Salcheto
Vintage:2007
Cost:$18.00
Comments: Sangiovese is the primary grape in Chianti but can produce an excellent varietal wine.

Food PairingsMeats & Seafood: Poached, grilled, fried, baked or roasted beef, lamb, game and game birds.
Sauce: au jus, savory, tomato, mustard, peppercorn
Cheese: Soft or hard goat cheese, hard cow and sheep cheese
Other:

Taste ProfileNotes:Rosso di Montalcino presents perfumed dark red fruits, silky tannins and a long, caressing finish. Very fruity with good acidity and pronounced tannins.
Quick Classification:Dry Red

Private NotesSource:KWWG 1003
Comments:

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Artemis Cabernet Sauvignon

Date: Fri, Mar 26, 2010

DescriptionName:Artemis Cabernet Sauvignon
Color:Red
Grape(s):92% Cabernet Sauvignon 8% Merlot
Appellation:Napa Valley
Maker:Stag's Leap Wine Cellars
Vintage:2006
Cost:$55.00
Comments:

Food PairingsMeats & Seafood: Poached, grilled, fried, baked or roasted beef, lamb, game and game birds.
Sauce: Au jus, savory, tomato, mustard, peppercorn
Cheese: Soft or hard goat cheese, hard cow and sheep cheese
Other: Chocolate

Taste ProfileNotes:Aromas and flavors of black fruit—blackberry, currant, and plum—that slowly give way to layers of nutmeg, rosemary, grilled game, and warm pie crust. Firmly structured and full-bodied, the wine gains depth and richness through the finish.
Quick Classification:Dry Red

Private NotesSource:Amedeo's wine list
Comments:

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